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Review: Bob Weir & Friends – TRIDay The 13th – TRI Studios – 5/13/11

When Bob Weir first announced TRI Studios, everyone was excited to blast off his self acclaimed “flying saucer.” What started off as a project just a few months ago, turned into an initiative webcast that delivered with clean results and exceeded expectations. The concept of web-casting in a studio has been done before by other bands, but to have an innovative sound system, high-definition cameras and audio, and a legendary musician behind it all, makes TRI Studios something destined to succeed. 

“TRIDay The 13th” featured nine musicians, all working with the tenth, Bob Weir, in a Ratdog musical environment. The set list and execution of playing was similar to that of the 2007 Ratdog lineup, consisting of Bob Weir, Jay Lane (Ratdog, Primus), Rob Wasserman (Ratdog), Robin Sylvester (Ratdog), Jeff Chimenti (Furthur, Ratdog), Steve Kimock (Ratdog, Zero) and a four piece horn section from the Marin Symphony Orchestra which Bob Weir just played with last weekend.

The broadcast started off with an introduction from Grateful Dead lyricist John Perry Barlow, actor Adam Busch, alongside Bob Weir’s father. With little extra time wasted, they introduced the launch off of TRI Studios, and off went Bob Weir. Bob previewed his August solo tour featuring four acoustic songs beginning with “The Music Never Stoppped.” He stopped in the middle of “Me and My Uncle” to adjust some equipment (in typical Weir character), and then continued on with the song. No matter what kind of speaker set up you had, Weir’s voice in clarity and his playing in strength really kicked in during the stripped down versions of “KC Moan” and “Looks Like Rain.”

The second half of the first set brought Scaring The Children into the picture; pre-2003 Ratdog bassist Rob Wasserman on acoustic bass, and Jay Lane on drums. This lineup with Weir on acoustic held true for a groovy “Corrina” and continuing with an equally fun “Friend Of The Devil.” Weir got on his electric guitar for a Scaring The Children jam frenzy on “Easy Answers.” Following “Easy Answers” was the addition of pianist Jeff Chimenti for an intense performance of “Days Between,” and segued into the bringing on of Steve Kimock and the horn section for the Bobby and the Midnites song “Josephine.” As “Josephine” was jammed out to its capability, a brilliant take on the psychedelic “The Other One,” landed the flying saucer for the first set.

As promised, the set break featured a social media Q&A with the chief, Bob Weir. The cameras took us into a green room where Weir was surrounded by his children and their friends. As fans asked questions from across the country, Weir made note that he plans on bringing Furthur and Chris Robinson’s band into the flying saucer this summer. After the social media questions had been asked, Adam Busch and JP Barlow turned to the children next to Bob to have them ask questions.

As the questions came to an end, Bob Weir walked off and the camera crew took some time to interview Mountain Girl. She explained the story behind the studio name (Tamalpais Research Institute). Mount Tamalpais is a mountain in Marin, near the studio and contains history that Weir found interesting.

Following Mountain Girl’s input on history about the studio’s name, the band was ready to start up again for the second set. It was clear that Weir loves playing in the form of Ratdog as they nailed “Ashes and Glass” and “Two Djinn” to start. “Sugaree” was highlighted by Steve Kimock and Jeff Chimenti both going to town on their guitar and keyboard connecting from across the studio. The Ratdog jam structure and approaches at songs built a energetic second set, touching upon “Cassidy,” “Bird Song,” and “West LA Fadeaway,” before moving back into an “Other One,” “Birdsong” and “Cassidy” reprises, ending out the memorable night.
Cassdy live from http://TRIstudios.com (Via @JPBarlow)
It was apparent Weir was having the time of his life and calling the shots with the friends from Ratdog that he made reference to in past interviews about TRI Studios. The overall production of the night was completely flawless, and the content that was provided was second to none. Deadheads can rejoice, they can enjoy the gift of live music in their living rooms on a higher level. TRI’s production provided a level of personality and character that isn’t always provided with online content, and it can only be assumed it will continue to be this way in the future.. 

Where will the saucer take off to next? Nothing is formally announced, and while we have a few ideas, it’s apparent that something is going to happen.

For now, Weir will get ready for a Wavy Gravy birthday show today, and Furthur tour in July.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bob Weir & Friends

TRI Studios

5/13/11

“TRIDay the 13th”

 

 

Set 1:

 

1. @The Music Never Stopped

2. @Me And My Uncle>

3. @KC Moan

4. @Looks Like Rain

5. #Corrina-

6. #Friend Of The Devil

7.$Easy Answers

8.%Days Between>

9.^Josephine>

10.^ The Other One

 

 

Set 2:

1.&Ashes & Glass>

2.&Two Djinn>

3.&Sugaree

4.&Cassidy>

5.&Bird Song>

6.&West LA Fadeaway>

7.&*The Other One>

8.&*Birdsong>

9.&*Cassidy

 

@ – Bob Weir solo acoustic

# – Bob Weir acoustic, Rob Wasserman acoustic bass, Jay Lane drums.

$ – Bob Weir electric, Rob Wasserman acoustic bass, Jay Lane drums.

% – Bob Weir electric, Rob Wasserman acoustic bass, Jay Lane drums, Jeff Chimenti piano.

^ – Bob Weir electric, Rob Wasserman acoustic bass, Jay Lane drums, Jeff Chimenti piano, Steve Kimock guitar, Horn section.

&- Bob Weir electric, Robin Sylvester Electric bass, Rob Wasserman acoustic bass, Jay Lane drums, Jeff Chimenti piano, Steve Kimock electric, Horns Section,

* – Reprise

 

***Note: First show at TRI Studios to be available online live as a webcast.***

 

TRI Studio’s Website

TRI Studio’s Twitter

TRI Studio’s Facebook

Bob Weir’s Website

 

About the Author

A young, aspiring music journalist out of the Verona, NJ area.

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